The Tester Must Understand the Stack

As testers, we test a piece of software against a variety of both written and unwritten functional and nonfunctional requirements.

One of the key tools in testing that software is having an understanding of the environment under which that software will run. We need to understand the pieces of the stack. We don’t need to be experts on every bit of it, but we need to understand what components are involved, and how they work together. I’ve found that often may folks will forget about parts of the stack, which can lead to red herrings or bad information when describing a situation or troubleshooting a problem.

Full Stack Testing, by Flickr user prettyinprint

For example, in my environment I’m usually testing web applications. For a given application, the following things are in place and need to be working correctly:

  • a web server (virtual) running on a host machine (physical)
  • a database server (virtual) running on a host machine (physical)
  • external (network) storage for the database
  • a working network between all of these servers and the client machine
  • DNS servers translating names into IP addresses to access the servers
  • a load balancer managing traffic between multiple web servers
  • IIS working correctly on the application server
  • zero or more APIs that are available and working
  • a web browser on the client machine that supports JavaScript

Even with this list, there’s a chance I’ve omitted something. Depending on the testing being performed or the issue being investigated, there’s a chance that any one of these components could be the culprit. Don’t forget about the entire stack.

Image by prettyinprint, used under Creative Commons licensing

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