Testers Don’t Just Test the Code

Kate Falanga chimed in recently with some thoughts around titles for testers, QA folks, and the like in Exploring Testing Titles in Agile. She lays out a few good reasons why the term Quality Assurance is a bad one, mainly that the role can’t really assure quality. I believe this. Heck, in the tagline on this site I refer to “(The myth of) Quality Assurance.”

She then outlines why she doesn’t like the title of Tester, feeling that it’s not broad enough to reflect all of the work that we do, and that it’s reactive:

It gives a very reactive rather than proactive connotation. If someone is a Tester then it is assumed that something needs to be tested. If you don’t have anything to be tested then why do you need a Tester? Why include them in planning or the project at all until you have something for them to do?

Quality Assurance / Testers / Job Title Adventures

The bad assumption here is that code is the only thing being tested, and that testing is the only thing done by a tester. Sure, once there’s code being written, a tester will probably spend a majority of her time exercising that code, but the tester participates in testing activities prior to the code. Time spent in requirements discussions helps the team write better requirements or user stories. Time spent learning about the business environment or the end user’s use cases will help the tester get into the right mindset for testing activities.

These activities aren’t testing in the sense of testing new code that’s been writing, but they’re testing activities. If testing allows us to learn information about the software being tested, and we use that information to improve product quality, all methods of learning could be considered test activities, could they not?

Do we continue the search for a better title than Tester, or do we work to help the broader software industry understand that Tester doesn’t just mean exercising code changes?

Image by Ruth Hartnop, used under Creative Commons licensing

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