Testers Don’t Just Test the Code

Kate Falanga chimed in recently with some thoughts around titles for testers, QA folks, and the like in Exploring Testing Titles in Agile. She lays out a few good reasons why the term Quality Assurance is a bad one, mainly that the role can’t really assure quality. I believe this. Heck, in the tagline on this site I refer to “(The myth of) Quality Assurance.”

She then outlines why she doesn’t like the title of Tester, feeling that it’s not broad enough to reflect all of the work that we do, and that it’s reactive:

It gives a very reactive rather than proactive connotation. If someone is a Tester then it is assumed that something needs to be tested. If you don’t have anything to be tested then why do you need a Tester? Why include them in planning or the project at all until you have something for them to do?

Quality Assurance / Testers / Job Title Adventures

The bad assumption here is that code is the only thing being tested, and that testing is the only thing done by a tester. Sure, once there’s code being written, a tester will probably spend a majority of her time exercising that code, but the tester participates in testing activities prior to the code. Time spent in requirements discussions helps the team write better requirements or user stories. Time spent learning about the business environment or the end user’s use cases will help the tester get into the right mindset for testing activities.

These activities aren’t testing in the sense of testing new code that’s been writing, but they’re testing activities. If testing allows us to learn information about the software being tested, and we use that information to improve product quality, all methods of learning could be considered test activities, could they not?

Do we continue the search for a better title than Tester, or do we work to help the broader software industry understand that Tester doesn’t just mean exercising code changes?

Image by Ruth Hartnop, used under Creative Commons licensing

Advertisements

When Quality Loses

Context: agile development with prioritization and release decisions being made by a product owner.

There’s often a false understanding of software quality (and the responsibility for software quality) in our industry. This falsehood isn’t helped by the “Quality Assurance” job title. With modern development practices, it’s misleading to presume that software testers are responsible for the quality of the released software.

QA as a Quality Advocate

As a software tester, we identify potential changes to the software. Sometimes it might be an obvious bug, where the software is not producing the response that’s clearly expected. Other times we might find potential enhancements such as new features or usability improvements. Either of these categories provide opportunities for improving the software. As a software testing and quality professional, I feel that I have an obligation to suggest that the software could always be better. When quality wins, users will have a better experience, and data will be in a quantifiable better state.

As a tester, I advocate for quality.

Testing != Release Decisions

Ultimately while I advocate for quality in the software I test, the ultimate decision on when to release (given whatever is known – or not known – about the quality of the software) belongs to someone else. In the agile world that’s usually the Product Owner; in other environments it might be a project manager, release manager, or other similar role.

That person – the one making the release decision – is the one who ultimately decides what level of quality is acceptable for a software release. Testers can help inform, but testers can’t insist.

Sometimes, we’ll advocate and our voices will be heard and the quality threshold will be raised prior to release. Sometimes, our voices will fall on deaf ears, or be drowned out by other voices or pressures.

Parked Cars, San Bruno Gas Line Explosion, 2010

The Release Where Quality Loses

When the quality isn’t up to par but the software is released anyway, expected repercussions will possibly and predictably include:

  • increased number of bugs-found-after-release
  • increased number of user support tickets
  • increased number of data or application hotfixes to resolve problems
  • PR or perception problems

Nobody in the development and product teams should be surprised by these results.  Sometimes there’s value in having the software released, even in a state of lessened quality, rather than holding it back to resolve more bugs.  The quality factor is one of many factors weighed in the release decision.  Sometimes quality loses.

As testers, we have to be okay with this, with the caveat that it’s not okay for the product team to blame the testers for the quality level of the product.  While many of us have the misnomer of “quality assurance” in our job titles, we can’t assure the quality when the release and budget decisions are out of our hands.

image via Thomas Hawk; used under Creative Commons licensing

On Explaining Yourself

We’ve been doing a fair amount of interviewing at my current employer, primarily looking for software developers to work on the same team where I break test software.

I find the interview process fascinating. I maintain that the most important skill for a member of a software development team is the ability to communicate effectively (both orally and in writing) and our interview process exercises those abilities.

I Care About the Why Over the What

Ideas, Problems, SolutionsSeveral of our interview questions are fairly open ended. There’s not a right answer (although occasionally there is a clearly wrong one). We aren’t as concerned with which of the nearly-unlimited potentially-right answers you give us, but more concerned with how you explain said answer. In fact, I’d rather hear a questionable answer with a solid explanation than a textbook-perfect answer but no ability to explain how one reached that conclusion.

That Explanation Translates to Software Design

We don’t want folks who can explain things just for the sake of explaining things… as we design software, those explanations are key. It seems that weekly (if not even more often) I’m engaged in a discussion with a developer and we talk through how a software component will behave. Perhaps they came up with the design on their own or perhaps it came about as a result of discussions with others.

Out of each one of these discussions, things evolve. Perhaps I offer an insight that changes the course of their design. Maybe they explain the rationale and my vision becomes clearer. Sometimes I play the role of the duck and they have an epiphany on their own.

Rarely does excellent software come from one developer working entirely on his or her own. Good software generally comes from a team… a team that can communicate and explain ideas.

photo by Flickr user poportis, used under Creative Commons licensing